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History

A History of Change

Ever since its construction was announced in 1934, The Symphony House has been emblematic of restoration and rejuvenation in Pinehurst, North Carolina. The Pinehurst Outlook reported that “It was a signal for villagers to dance in the streets and church bells to ring, for it meant the first substantial winter home to be built in Pinehurst since the depression.”

Lansing B. Warner, an insurance executive from Chicago, commissioned architect William C. Holleyman of Greensboro, North Carolina to design the home that featured Colonial Revival and Georgian aesthetics. Both exterior and interior details such as the Chippendale staircase railing showcase Holleyman’s eye for tasteful design and craftsmanship. Holleyman also designed the Razook’s Building and the Village Court in Pinehurst.

Dirt from the rear lot had been used for years as a “borrow pit” to build up local roads. Mr. Warner transformed that spot into a sunken garden, a feature the house retains to this day.

During the 1940s, James Stillman Rockerfeller— the great-nephew of John D. Rockerfeller—and his wife Nancy Carnegie—the grand-niece of Andrew Carnegie—occupied the house along with Nancy’s father, Andrew Carnegie II.

Beauty Restored

After passing through the hands of several owners in the following decades, the house was abandoned for several years. In 2018 it was restored to its former glory and updated with contemporary touches. The house preserves its original floors, cabinets, plaster walls, single-pane glass, and curved windows, giving the home a sophisticated atmosphere, while high-tech fixtures and amenities make it easy to dial in comfort in every room.

Today the Symphony House is a model of how a historic home can be transformed and revitalized to create an oasis for everyone to enjoy, and it lives on as a important milestone in Pinehurst’s history.

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